Month: February 2019

  • February 28, 2019

    Diagnosis and Management of Dementia

    This 8-week mentor led online course along with virtual contact sessions (1 Day Interactive Workshop & Assessment) covers all the important aspects of understanding the broad concepts of dementia, identifying the common types of dementia, behavioural issues in dementia, basic principles of dementia management along with bed side teaching sessions which assists in appropriate diagnosis of a dementia patient On completion of the course, learner should be able to: Understand the broad concepts of dementia and its burden in society Identify common causes of dementia Acquire basic principles of dementia management Recognise when to refer a dementia patient to specialist services Create awareness about healthy aging and dementia in the community
  • February 28, 2019

    Master Class in Fetal Echo

    Master Class in Fetal Echocardiography is exclusively meant for practicing radiologists, post graduate (MD, DMRD, DNB – radiology students). Content of the course is designed to meet the requirement of students, beginners or those who already have some degree of competency in scanning and who wish to improve their skills specifically in Fetal Echocardiography without any interruption of their routine practice. This 4-module online course covers all the important aspects of fetal cardiac scanning, including cardiac embryology, circulation, the basics of echocardiography, normal views, common fetal cardiac anomalies, major lethal anomalies with presentation of multiple cases and finally tips & tricks which will enable the radiologists to understand the presentation of various anomalies in a better way. On completion of this course, the radiologists should be able to: Understand and recognize the basic cardiac embryology and fetal circulation Perform basic and advanced Fetal Echocardiography in an improved way Identify the common forms of congenital heart disease with enhanced accuracy Relate abnormal Echocardiography findings to the clinical outcome
  • February 28, 2019

    Fellowship In Diabetic Foot Management (FDFM)

    As per IDF data, approximately 425 million people are affected by diabetes across the globe, significant part of whom are in the Asia pacific region. India is now the diabetes capital of the world with 73 million people affected. It is estimated that diabetes would affect more than 12% of the population by 2025 (source – IDF atlas 8 edition). Foot complication is one of the most serious conditions, affecting 19% – 25% of diabetic population. It is noteworthy that one third of the expenditure on diabetic care is linked to management of foot ulcers. Diabetic foot care is in its incipient stage in India and Asia, however, foot complications due to diabetes are increasing at an alarming pace. About 100 thousand lower limb amputations are conducted among diabetic patients in India per year. It should be the utmost endeavor of every physician dealing with diabetic care to give comprehensive diabetic care, including foot care to the patients that can improve the quality of life and reduce the amputations due to diabetes amongst the population. Fellowship in Diabetic Foot Management (FDFM) is India’s 6 months mentor led, blended learning program in podiatry. It includes online video modules, live webinars & workshops, hands on training, MCQs and descriptive assessments along with in-person mentoring. The course covers a wide variety of practice essential topics such as applied anatomy, biomechanics of the foot, advanced diabetic foot management techniques such as plasma replacement therapy, ultrasonic debridement and role of orthotics and many more. The program is conducted under the able guidance and mentorship of leading national and international experts. On successful completion of course, candidates shall be awarded a completion certificate with accreditation from Indian Podiatry Association (IPA).
  • February 28, 2019

    MASTERING PUBMED : BASICS

    In the recent years, the internet has become an important source for medical information. As a health science student or professional, there is always a need to stay updated with the latest research and apply it for patient care. The medical education curriculum does not teach one how to search online in a systematic manner. This course is intended to help medical students, academicians, practitioners and other learners to integrate best practices in searching medical literature from PubMed. The course is developed with new age learning technologies, keeping the young learners in mind. It is delivered in partnership with Mediknit, a leading professional medical education organization.
  • February 28, 2019

    Master Class in Fetal Echocardiography

    Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect and accounts to one-third of all congenital anomalies. Studies have proved that Fetal Echocardiography helps in effective identification and enhanced pre-natal detection of CHD. Having said that, accurate identification of fetal anomalies, needs the radiologist to be sufficiently trained and appropriately skilled. This ‘Master Class in Fetal Echocardiography’, is the first in ‘REFER Series’ developed and delivered by Dr. Pradeep Srinivasan to bring about significant improvement in the standards of fetal imaging and early detection of fetal anomalies.

Recent Posts

  • More than eight out of 10 teachers say mental health among pupils in England has deteriorated in the past two years – with rising reports of anxiety, self-harm and even cases of suicide – against a backdrop of inadequate support in schools. In a survey of 8,600 school leaders, teachers and support workers, 83% said they had witnessed an increase in the number of children in their care with poor mental health, rising to 90% among students in colleges. Many described a sense of helplessness in the face of the crisis. One said it was “like a slow-motion car crash for our young people that I am powerless to stop and can’t bear to watch or be part of any more” Others complained that real-terms funding cuts in schools were making it harder to support pupils in need, with fewer support staff available. “We are at a crisis point with mental health,” one respondent said. “Much more anxiety, self-harming. Three suicides in three years in my school alone,” said another. The survey of members of the National Education Union before their conference in Liverpool this week also asked about the support available in schools to pupils in distress. Fewer than half said their school had a counsellor, three out of 10 (30%) had been able to access external specialist support such as NHS child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS), fewer than 30% had a school nurse and only 12% had a “mental health first aider”, as favoured by the government. More than a third of respondents (37%) had training in the past year to help with supporting young people with mental ill health, but there were complaints that it was often inadequate and ineffective. “Mental health first aid is a lip service,” said one. “Seven members of staff trained – nothing...
  • With the rising influence of tech companies such as Amazon and Google in almost every sphere of life, it may be no surprise that these major players are now venturing into the healthcare space. Emerging healthcare technologies 2019 Our world has become increasingly digitised and this has created the opportunity for electronic devices such as smart speakers to streamline patient experiences. Products currently used by tens of millions of US citizens include Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant. These devices have the potential to decrease the time spent manually updating patient records, allowing physicians to spend more time with their patients. Such technologies might also reduce the financial burden on healthcare systems by allowing patients to have certain medical questions answered, book appointments and receive reminders. With this market estimated at about $3.5 trillion the financial incentive for tech companies to enter the healthcare industry is significant. US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Recently, Amazon announced it would allow developers to create HIPAA-compliant healthcare abilities for its electronic assistant, Alexa. These developers will have to comply with HIPAA (the US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996), which functions to ensure the protection of patient information. Programmes currently in development for Alexa will allow patients to access their medical records and check the results of certain medical tests. For instance, Livongo has created a programme for patients to access their blood sugar level readings by voice commands. Amazon has also launched its Comprehend Medical, a machine learning tool that gathers information on physician notes and patient health records. Other companies with electronic assistants, such as Google, have the potential to compete with Amazon in the healthcare sector but will need to catch up with Amazon’s HIPAA compliance if they want to stay competitive. According to the HIPAA Journal, Google...
  • WASHINGTON: India has shortage of an estimated 600,000 doctors and 2 million nurses, say scientists who found that lack of staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics is preventing patients from accessing live-saving drugs. Even when antibiotics are available, patients are often unable to afford them. High out-of-pocket medical costs to the patient are compounded by limited government spending for health services, according to the report by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) in the US In India, 65 per cent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, and such expenditures push some 57 million people into poverty each year. The majority of the world’s annual 5.7 million antibiotic-treatable deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries where the mortality burden from treatable bacterial infections far exceeds the estimated annual 700,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections. Researchers at CDDEP in the US conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Health facilities in many low- and middle-income countries are substandard and lack staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics. n India, there is one government doctor for every 10,189 people (the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a ratio of 1:1,000), or a deficit of 600,000 doctors, and the nurse:patient ratio is 1:483, implying a shortage of two million nurses. “Lack of access to antibiotics kills more people currently than does antibiotic resistance, but we have not had a good handle on why these barriers are created,” said Ramanan Laxminarayan, director at CDDEP. The findings of the report show that even after the discovery of a new antibiotic, regulatory hurdles and substandard health facilities delay or altogether prevent widespread market entry and drug availability,” Laxminarayan said in a statement. “Our research shows that of...