FDFM

  • The rise of bacteria that are resistant to multiple drugs highlights the urgency of developing new antibiotics to combat lower extremity infection. Accordingly, this author explores the potential of new pharmacological agents such as tedizolid, oritavancin, dalbavancin and delafloxacin, and discusses other agents in the pipeline. Since the introduction of penicillin as the first true antibiotic in 1928, a plethora of antibiotics has become commercially available and has had a profound impact on life. Antibiotics are manufactured worldwide at an estimated scale of about 100,000 tons annually but the common use of antibiotics for farm animals, aquaculture and human therapy has led to increased strains of pathogens becoming antibiotic resistant.1 Some pathogens have become resistant to multiple antibiotics and pharmaceutical agents, leading to the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. An example of such phenomenon is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In addition to being resistant to methicillin, MRSA is usually also resistant to aminoglycosides, macrolides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, lincosamides and disinfectants.1 Multidrug resistance in bacteria occurs secondary to one of two mechanisms. One is by the accumulation of multiple resistant genes within a single bacterial cell. This accumulation generally occurs on resistance plasmids or transposons of genes with each coding for resistance to a specific drug agent.1,2 Another mechanism is by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps that essentially have the ability to extrude more than one drug type out of the bacterial cell.1 Researchers reported the first case of MRSA in Great Britain in 1961 and in the U.S. in 1968.2Interestingly, vancomycin, an antibiotic that was first discovered in the 1950s but bypassed in favor of other antibiotics deemed equally or more efficacious and less toxic, was resurrected in the 1980s for the treatment of MRSA and pseudomembranous enterocolitis.3This dramatic resurgence led to a 100-fold increase in the use of...
  • February 28, 2019

    Fellowship In Diabetic Foot Management (FDFM)

    As per IDF data, approximately 425 million people are affected by diabetes across the globe, significant part of whom are in the Asia pacific region. India is now the diabetes capital of the world with 73 million people affected. It is estimated that diabetes would affect more than 12% of the population by 2025 (source – IDF atlas 8 edition). Foot complication is one of the most serious conditions, affecting 19% – 25% of diabetic population. It is noteworthy that one third of the expenditure on diabetic care is linked to management of foot ulcers. Diabetic foot care is in its incipient stage in India and Asia, however, foot complications due to diabetes are increasing at an alarming pace. About 100 thousand lower limb amputations are conducted among diabetic patients in India per year. It should be the utmost endeavor of every physician dealing with diabetic care to give comprehensive diabetic care, including foot care to the patients that can improve the quality of life and reduce the amputations due to diabetes amongst the population. Fellowship in Diabetic Foot Management (FDFM) is India’s 6 months mentor led, blended learning program in podiatry. It includes online video modules, live webinars & workshops, hands on training, MCQs and descriptive assessments along with in-person mentoring. The course covers a wide variety of practice essential topics such as applied anatomy, biomechanics of the foot, advanced diabetic foot management techniques such as plasma replacement therapy, ultrasonic debridement and role of orthotics and many more. The program is conducted under the able guidance and mentorship of leading national and international experts. On successful completion of course, candidates shall be awarded a completion certificate with accreditation from Indian Podiatry Association (IPA).

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  • With the rising influence of tech companies such as Amazon and Google in almost every sphere of life, it may be no surprise that these major players are now venturing into the healthcare space. Emerging healthcare technologies 2019 Our world has become increasingly digitised and this has created the opportunity for electronic devices such as smart speakers to streamline patient experiences. Products currently used by tens of millions of US citizens include Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant. These devices have the potential to decrease the time spent manually updating patient records, allowing physicians to spend more time with their patients. Such technologies might also reduce the financial burden on healthcare systems by allowing patients to have certain medical questions answered, book appointments and receive reminders. With this market estimated at about $3.5 trillion the financial incentive for tech companies to enter the healthcare industry is significant. US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Recently, Amazon announced it would allow developers to create HIPAA-compliant healthcare abilities for its electronic assistant, Alexa. These developers will have to comply with HIPAA (the US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996), which functions to ensure the protection of patient information. Programmes currently in development for Alexa will allow patients to access their medical records and check the results of certain medical tests. For instance, Livongo has created a programme for patients to access their blood sugar level readings by voice commands. Amazon has also launched its Comprehend Medical, a machine learning tool that gathers information on physician notes and patient health records. Other companies with electronic assistants, such as Google, have the potential to compete with Amazon in the healthcare sector but will need to catch up with Amazon’s HIPAA compliance if they want to stay competitive. According to the HIPAA Journal, Google...
  • WASHINGTON: India has shortage of an estimated 600,000 doctors and 2 million nurses, say scientists who found that lack of staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics is preventing patients from accessing live-saving drugs. Even when antibiotics are available, patients are often unable to afford them. High out-of-pocket medical costs to the patient are compounded by limited government spending for health services, according to the report by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) in the US In India, 65 per cent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, and such expenditures push some 57 million people into poverty each year. The majority of the world’s annual 5.7 million antibiotic-treatable deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries where the mortality burden from treatable bacterial infections far exceeds the estimated annual 700,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections. Researchers at CDDEP in the US conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Health facilities in many low- and middle-income countries are substandard and lack staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics. n India, there is one government doctor for every 10,189 people (the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a ratio of 1:1,000), or a deficit of 600,000 doctors, and the nurse:patient ratio is 1:483, implying a shortage of two million nurses. “Lack of access to antibiotics kills more people currently than does antibiotic resistance, but we have not had a good handle on why these barriers are created,” said Ramanan Laxminarayan, director at CDDEP. The findings of the report show that even after the discovery of a new antibiotic, regulatory hurdles and substandard health facilities delay or altogether prevent widespread market entry and drug availability,” Laxminarayan said in a statement. “Our research shows that of...