webeducation

  • KCI, now a part of the Acelity Company, has announced that its PREVENA negative pressure incision management system is the first to receive FDA’s indication to help with reducing superficial surgical site infections in those at high risk of post-op infections. The approval comes under the FDA’s de novo pathway that was designed to bring forward new technologies that may help address important medical necessities. The PREVENA system is a disposable product that is used to cover and protect a wound, and it negative pressure force of -125mmHg helps to drain the wound of fluids. It was previously approved by the FDA to prevent seromas. “This indication from the FDA is further proof of our intent to bring to market technologies that accelerate healing while reducing the cost of care,” in a statement said R. Andrew Eckert, Chief Executive Officer, KCI. “PREVENA™ Incision Management System has a multitude of published studies that consistently demonstrate efficacy in lowering post-surgical wound complications, specifically SSIs. This indication from the FDA demonstrates our commitment to addressing the infection-related burdens faced by healthcare systems and the emotional toll faced by patients.” Some details on the studies that led to the approval, according to KCI: A meta-analysis including 30 studies from a systematic literature review of 540 publications from a 13 year period entitled, “Meta-Analysis of Comparative Trials Evaluating a Single-Use Closed-Incision Negative-Pressure Therapy System,” recently published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, demonstrated that PREVENA™ Therapy performed significantly better at reducing the incidence of SSIs in comparison to traditional and advanced wound dressings. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies were assessed across specialties, including cardiothoracic, lower extremity, colorectal/abdominal, obstetrics and vascular surgery. For Article Source Click Here
  • Despite the health sector employing five million workers in India it continues to have low density of health professionals with figures for the country being lower than those of Sri Lanka, China, Thailand, United Kingdom and Brazil, according to a World Health Organisation database. This workforce statistic has put the country into the “critical shortage of healthcare providers” category. Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan are the worst hit while Delhi, Kerala, Punjab and Gujarat compare favourably. “Southeast Asia needs a 50% increase in healthcare manpower to achieve universal health coverage by 2030. India faces the problem of acute shortages and inequitable distributions of skilled health workers as have many other low- and middle-income countries,’’ said K. Srinath Reddy, president, Public Health Foundation of India. New courses needed He said that the need of the hour is to design courses for different categories of non-physician care providers. Competencies (and not qualification alone) should be valued and reform must be brought in regulatory structures to provide flexibility for innovations, he added. “Data on the prevalence of occupational vacancies in the health care system in India overall is scarce. Government statistics for 2008, based on vacancies in sanctioned posts showed 18% of primary health centres were without a doctor, about 38% were without a laboratory technician and 16% were without a pharmacist,” says a paper titled ‘Forecasting the future need and gaps in requirements for public health professionals in India upto 2026’ published in the WHO South-East Asia Journal of Public Health. The health workforce in India comprises broadly eight categories, namely: doctors (allopathic, alternative medicine); nursing and midwifery professionals; public health professionals (medical, non-medical); pharmacists; dentists; paramedical workers (allied health professionals); grass-root workers (frontline workers); and support staff. Click here for the article source 
  • There’s no effective treatment for dementia, which affects 50 million people worldwide, but the World Health Organization says there’s much can be done to delay or slow the onset and progression of the disease. In guidelines released Tuesday, WHO issued its first recommendations to reduce the risk of dementia globally. They include regular physical exercise, not using tobacco, drinking less alcohol, maintaining healthy blood pressure and eating a healthy diet — particularly a Mediterranean one. The international health body also warned against taking dietary supplements such as vitamins B and E in an effort to combat cognitive decline and dementia. “While some people are unlucky and inherit a combination of genes that makes it highly likely they will develop dementia, many people have the opportunity to substantially reduce their risk by living a healthy lifestyle,” professor Tara Spires-Jones, UK Dementia Research Institute program lead and deputy director of the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences at the University of Edinburgh, told the Science Media Center. Mediterranean diet: How to start (and stay on) one of the world’s healthiest diets “The WHO has looked at the available evidence and made recommendations that some lifestyle changes, in particular increasing exercise before any cognitive symptoms are present, can reduce dementia risk,” she added. “Other recommendations have a less strong evidence base but may have evidence that they do not increase risk or harm and can therefore be recommended safely, although their impact on risk is less certain.” WHO said there are 10 million new cases of dementia every year, and this figure is set to triple by 2050. The disease is a major cause of disability and dependency among older people and “can devastate the lives of affected individuals, their carers and families,” the organization said. The disease also exacts a heavy economic toll,...
  • Research shows that music therapy in neonatal intensive care units helps infants get released from the hospital early. Experts in Florida helped pioneer the practice, and now it’s expanding. For centuries, lullabies have helped soothe babies to sleep. But it’s only in the last couple decades that research showed, for premature babies, these slow, simple tunes could be life-changing. Rich Moats, who manages the music therapy program at AdventHealth Orlando, said babies in the neonatal intensive care unit are unique patients. “The mom’s belly is the most protective environment for them, but when they’re born early they’re thrust into this world they’re not quite ready to handle,” she said. “So lights, sounds, being touched at different times, learning how to eat is even a thing as adults we don’t think about that, but that could also be a stressful experience for these tiny little babies.” And when a baby is stressed, that can affect its brain permanently. Treatment with roots in Florida Jayne Standley directs the music therapy program at Florida State University and is considered by many to be the pioneer of its use in NICUs. Jayne Standley, music therapy professor at FSU CREDIT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY She started experimenting with the treatment about 20 years ago after she learned kids born premature were 50 percent more likely to need special education when they got older. “For fetuses, the neurological system develops in the third trimester, the last three months, so a baby that’s born three months early is having its brain develop in the conditions of the NICU,” she explained. Those conditions can lead to unstable breathing and heart rates. Poking and prodding from medical procedures can also cause infants’ brains to associate touch with pain. And living off a feeding tube for an extended period of time can leave babies...
  • Medical school students everywhere take note: if you want a date to go with your degree, it pays to be a surgeon. According to a survey conducted by UniformDating.com, a dating website “for singles in uniform & for those who like them,” surgeons are the most attractive type of doctor. Out of 1,000 men and women polled, 36% of women and 26% of men picked surgeons as the most datable genera of medical professional. Second place went to pediatricians, who received votes from 28% of women and 23% of men. So why did surgeons take the top spot? Respondents believed most are practically minded, possess a high IQ, and can remain calm in difficult situations. The fact that surgeons are likely to be “good with their hands” was cited as an additional plus. There’s even good news for doctors in other fields. While the slice-n-dice types may be seen as the most dateable, a full 89% of those surveyed answered “Hell Yes” when asked if they found doctors in general attractive. According to UniformDating, 41% of men have even flirted with a doctor while in the process of being treated for an injury or illness (women reported doing the same roughly half as often). That’s some serious commitment by doctor-lovers out there. Unfortunately for psychiatrists, this sentiment does not extend equally to everyone in the medical profession. Only 6% of women and 10% men said they would most like to date a shrink, perhaps fearing that dinner and a movie might feel more like a few hours on Sigmund Freud’s couch. Before those without an M.D. despair, the survey also offers some dating clues that might be more generally applicable. UniformDating speculates that “there must be something about that plain, white coat that makes [women] look capable and in command.”...
  • In a major medical breakthrough, Tel Aviv University researchers have “printed” the world’s first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient’s own cells and biological materials. Their findings were published on April 15 in a study in Advanced Science. Until now, scientists in regenerative medicine — a field positioned at the crossroads of biology and technology — have been successful in printing only simple tissues without blood vessels. “This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” says Prof. Tal Dvir of TAU’s School of Molecular Cell Biology and Biotechnology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Sagol Center for Regenerative Biotechnology, who led the research for the study. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among both men and women in the United States. Heart transplantation is currently the only treatment available to patients with end-stage heart failure. Given the dire shortage of heart donors, the need to develop new approaches to regenerate the diseased heart is urgent. “This heart is made from human cells and patient-specific biological materials. In our process these materials serve as the bioinks, substances made of sugars and proteins that can be used for 3D printing of complex tissue models,” Prof. Dvir says. “People have managed to 3D-print the structure of a heart in the past, but not with cells or with blood vessels. Our results demonstrate the potential of our approach for engineering personalized tissue and organ replacement in the future.” Research for the study was conducted jointly by Prof. Dvir, Dr. Assaf Shapira of TAU’s Faculty of Life Sciences and Nadav Moor, a doctoral student in Prof. Dvir’s lab. “At this stage, our 3D heart is small, the size of a rabbit’s heart,”...
  • More than eight out of 10 teachers say mental health among pupils in England has deteriorated in the past two years – with rising reports of anxiety, self-harm and even cases of suicide – against a backdrop of inadequate support in schools. In a survey of 8,600 school leaders, teachers and support workers, 83% said they had witnessed an increase in the number of children in their care with poor mental health, rising to 90% among students in colleges. Many described a sense of helplessness in the face of the crisis. One said it was “like a slow-motion car crash for our young people that I am powerless to stop and can’t bear to watch or be part of any more” Others complained that real-terms funding cuts in schools were making it harder to support pupils in need, with fewer support staff available. “We are at a crisis point with mental health,” one respondent said. “Much more anxiety, self-harming. Three suicides in three years in my school alone,” said another. The survey of members of the National Education Union before their conference in Liverpool this week also asked about the support available in schools to pupils in distress. Fewer than half said their school had a counsellor, three out of 10 (30%) had been able to access external specialist support such as NHS child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS), fewer than 30% had a school nurse and only 12% had a “mental health first aider”, as favoured by the government. More than a third of respondents (37%) had training in the past year to help with supporting young people with mental ill health, but there were complaints that it was often inadequate and ineffective. “Mental health first aid is a lip service,” said one. “Seven members of staff trained – nothing...
  • WASHINGTON: India has shortage of an estimated 600,000 doctors and 2 million nurses, say scientists who found that lack of staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics is preventing patients from accessing live-saving drugs. Even when antibiotics are available, patients are often unable to afford them. High out-of-pocket medical costs to the patient are compounded by limited government spending for health services, according to the report by the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) in the US In India, 65 per cent of health expenditure is out-of-pocket, and such expenditures push some 57 million people into poverty each year. The majority of the world’s annual 5.7 million antibiotic-treatable deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries where the mortality burden from treatable bacterial infections far exceeds the estimated annual 700,000 deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections. Researchers at CDDEP in the US conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Health facilities in many low- and middle-income countries are substandard and lack staff who are properly trained in administering antibiotics. n India, there is one government doctor for every 10,189 people (the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a ratio of 1:1,000), or a deficit of 600,000 doctors, and the nurse:patient ratio is 1:483, implying a shortage of two million nurses. “Lack of access to antibiotics kills more people currently than does antibiotic resistance, but we have not had a good handle on why these barriers are created,” said Ramanan Laxminarayan, director at CDDEP. The findings of the report show that even after the discovery of a new antibiotic, regulatory hurdles and substandard health facilities delay or altogether prevent widespread market entry and drug availability,” Laxminarayan said in a statement. “Our research shows that of...
  • Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) or nosocomial infections are complex to treat and are a growing global burden. HAIs affect about one in 25 patients in the US and situation is worse in resource-poor nations. A prevalence survey conducted under WHO in 55 hospitals of 14 countries showed that ~8.7% of in-patients had HAIs. At any time, over 1.4 million people worldwide suffer from infectious complications acquired in hospital. HAIs contributes to increased economic burden, negatively affecting quality of life and deaths. 1,2 As per the existing methodologies direct observation is the gold standard to monitor compliance and to prevent or reduce HAIs. Frequent surveys, interviews and inspections are the other commonest methods implemented as prevention of HAIs. Indirect monitoring involves automated monitoring systems (video monitoring , real time location systems) monitoring hand hygiene product consumption). Hospitals with sophisticated information systems are in a position to streamline surveillance process through computer-based algorithms that identifies patients at highest risk of HAI.3 4 Computerized surveillance helps in better implementation of preventive strategies, but lower infection rates have not been proven conclusively. Conventional training methodologies have not proved to be significantly impactful in knowledge retention and message recall. A newer approach called Gamification is a positive and effective method to change behaviour. It can engage, motivate and influence people. It is a concept that has unknowingly been applied for years though the term was widely used only after 2010. A ‘serious game’ is defined as an ‘interactive computer application, with or without significant hardware component, that has a challenging goal, is fun to play and engaging, incorporates some scoring mechanism, and supplies the user with skills, knowledge or attitudes useful in reality. A hand hygiene improvement campaign in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary (Scotland, UK) using the SureWash gesture recognition system (SureWash, IRL) which concluded that...
  • Surgical practice has evolved over the centuries, more so in past 2 decades. However, continuing surgical education practices remain antique. Strongly dependent on hands-on-training, surgeons limitations of travel and time dedication, affects access to learning. Newer technologies for adaptive and immersive learning, including virtual reality and augmented reality has evolved over the past 5 years. It’s use might help to improve reach and quality of professional surgical education.  But some key questions to be answered are access to technology, adaptability and behaviour change. As an experiment, one year skill development program, Diploma in Minimal Access Surgery, with 80% of learning happening online and 20% offline was introduced for the first time in India to train surgeons on minimal access surgery. Online included the use of smart learning management system with AI, virtual reality, augmented reality, real time app based logbook, live surgery streaming and scheduled mentor interactions. Offline training included over the shoulder learning, hands-on and interactive class room learning over one week. Program enrolled 70 students in the first batch. In total 67/70 accessed the course (Ongoing). Over the period of 8 months, 34 video modules, 8 live interactions, including surgery streaming and one in person session with faculty, were conducted. Course received 100% attendance, with 3 or less reminders. A survey conducted at half time, to evaluate the effectiveness and net promoter,  73% responded (49/67). Average rating for the course stood at 4.35/5. Majority felt ‘Live Surgeries’ and ‘Virtual Contact Sessions’ were the most helpful ones. Ninetysix percent (96%: 47/49) said they either ‘agree/strongly agree’ that faculty provided all the necessary information during live surgeries and video lectures. When asked about ‘How likely are you to recommend the course to your peers?’, 47/49 rated either =or>7/10, and 26 responded 10/10. Providing the course a net promoter score of...

Recent Posts

  • Researchers at the Technion–Israel Institute of Technology have developed a glue gun to put the human body back together when it has been seriously injured. The pins and stitches currently used to treat serious injuries come with drawbacks: They can be painful, they leave scars, they require high skill from the doctor, and they sometimes have to be removed after the tissues heal. Suture on the intestine, lungs or blood vessels often leak and therefore require a sealant. The medical glue that the researchers have developed is a “two in one,” said Prof. Boaz Mizrahi, head of the Biomaterials Laboratory of the Technion. It replaces both stitches and the sealant, and is good for both external and internal injuries, he said. All sorts of medical glues are already being used in dermatology, surgery, and other areas. Israeli startup Nanomedic Technologies Ltd., for example, has developed a medical device that it says can dress burns and other wounds with nano materials that mimic human tissue and peel off once the skin below is regenerated. Still, the glues currently in use to replace sutures and staples are limited by their mechanical properties and toxicity, the researchers said. Because they are very toxic, they can be utilized only on the surface of the skin. In addition, hardening of the glue may make the organ less flexible or the adhesion may not be sufficiently strong. With these limitations in mind, researchers have been on the hunt for a glue that is suitable for different tissues, nontoxic, and flexible after hardening. Such a glue would also need to decompose in the body after the tissue is fused together. Mizrahi worked together with doctoral student Alona Shagan and came up with what they say is a “very strong, nontoxic tissue adhesive that remains flexible even after solidification.” Their study...
  • Pinnacle Ventures has launched a pharmacogenomics programme to enable genetic testing to drive personalised prescribing decisions. The innovation arm of Pinnacle Midlands Health Network, a not-for-profit primary health care management company in New Zealand, is also working on embedding biomarker information into electronic health records and linking it to a clinical-decision support prescribing tool that can help prescribers by providing direct access to international pathways and guidelines. Pharmacogenetics involves prescriptions being tailored to a person’s genetic make-up, as people metabolise drugs in different ways, which can have a significant impact on a drug’s effectiveness. Ventures plans to do about 5,000 pharmacogenetic tests over the next 12 months, says chief executive John Macaskill-Smith. Some will be self-funded because individuals are struggling with their medications and others will be fully funded by Ventures, targeting specific groups within the Midlands population. Macaskill-Smith says it is a simple test that covers 65–70 per cent of medications frequently prescribed in New Zealand. “The New Zealand health system is under strain but using testing like this you could reduce the trial and error of prescribing and prevent adverse reactions to medications,” he said. Ethnicity plays a big part in how a person metabolises drugs, but the clinical trials that prescribing information are based on very rarely involve Māori or Pasifika test subjects. Macaskill-Smith said Ventures is partnering with key kiwi groups, Auckland University and Otago University medical schools and Callaghan Innovation to support research and develop a better understanding of how unique New Zealand populations respond to different medications. People who have a pharmacogenetic test can choose to consent to contributing their non-identifiable demographic information to researchers. Embedding the biomarker information into EHRs ensures a patient’s results are used for both current and future prescribing decisions, he said. Macaskill-Smith says a lot of direct-to-consumer online genetic-testing tools involve people...
  • Surgery students spend so much time on screens that they have lost the ability to perform simple tasks such as stitching and sewing up patients, a professor has warned. Roger Kneebone, a professor of surgical education at Imperial College, London, says the focus on academic knowledge has come at the expense of craftsmanship. “It is important and an increasingly urgent issue,” Kneebone told the BBC. “It is a concern of mine and my scientific colleagues that whereas in the past you could make the assumption that students would leave school able to do certain practical things – cutting things out, making things – that is no longer the case.” The professor, who teaches surgery to medical students, believes that this is down to an increase in technology which takes away the experience of handling materials and developing skills. ”An obvious example is of a surgeon needing some dexterity and skill in sewing or stitching,” he explained. ”A lot of things are reduced to swiping on a two-dimensional flat screen” Kneebone adds that a growing number of students are becoming “less competent and less confident” in using their hands, resulting in young professionals who “have very high exam grades but lack tactile general knowledge”. The professor will be speaking on Tuesday at the V&A Museum of Childhood in east London, at the launch of a report, published by the Edge Foundation, calling for more creativity in the curriculum. The report warns that entries to creative subjects have fallen by 20 per cent since 2010, including a 57 per cent fall in design and technology GCSE. Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, who will be speaking alongside Professor Kneebone added: “Creativity is not just for artists. “Subjects like design and technology, music, art and drama are vitally important for...